Pantoum for Early Spring

We dance from black and white into living color.
The brown garden is unveiled through receding snow.
Twig tips pointillate in copper, red, and gold.
Morning sun glows lemon through dewy leaves.

The brown garden is unveiled through receding snow.
Our mountainside froths in golden trees.
Morning sun glows lemon through dewy leaves.
Dandelions shower the emerald fields.

Our mountainside froths in golden trees.
A flash of Indigo Buntings startles the eye.
Dandelions shower the emerald fields.
A violet sky warns of a looming storm.

A flash of Indigo Buntings startles the eye.
Twig tips pointillate in copper, red, and gold.
A violet sky warns of a looming storm.
We dance from black and white into living color.

Ruth E. Holleran
May 2017
Inspired by Writing Gang poetry lesson

About lettersfromheartscontent

Mother of six, homeschool teacher, tutor with Classical Conversations, wife to a forester and educator. I tend a perennial garden with a riot of blossoms, ride my bicycle in and out of the watershed, play ocarina and a boom-chick accompaniment when my kids feel like playing contradance music. I love being home, but I love an open road and adventure, too. Classical Conversations' Writers Circle carries my article on some aspect of classical education once a month.
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2 Responses to Pantoum for Early Spring

  1. godsbooklover says:

    I LOVE this!! I read through it just noting the progression of colors. So apt. I have never written a pantoum but your lovely examples encourage me to try.

    • I just started to reading again Sidney and Spenser: Poet as Maker and see right there in black and white what I am learning; that the poetry is in the content and form is just a dressing. I love starting young poets with a pantoum because it is a string of images. Rhyming is unnecessary. Furthermore, each sentence takes on new meaning when it shifts in context, giving the author quite an opportunity for nuance and artistry. So it can end up a sophisticated piece of art, satisfying to a writer of mature sensibilities. Far more satisfying than diamonte or even, dare I say, haiku (at least as beginners do them).

      Do try one!

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