Practical Tutor 2

What is the best way to prepare this summer for a year of tutoring Challenge B in Classical Conversations?

Make yourself familiar with the Guide, poring over it so you know what is coming. Then set aside time to study.  I am very, very glad I worked through Introductory Logic during that first summer.  I also recommend making Latin flashcards for at least the first six weeks and drilling vocab and endings. I would not start to research current events topics or even the scientists. Can you find time to read some of Soul of Science?  You’ll encounter quite a few of our guys in that, and it gives us a big picture that is helpful. The details you can work out week to week. If you explore the scientists and current events just ahead of the students, you will have fresh interest and excitement, which makes your presentation more exciting.

Is there a book on classical education waiting on your bedside table?  You’ll be transformed (into a classical tutor) through the renewing of your mind. Feel like you have a long way to go?  Join the crowd!  But I can testify that classical education is not only informative, but formative! It forms our mind and we are becoming better thinkers, better tutors. I recommend each tutor feed that process by perusing a book on classical education each summer, starting with Echo in Celebration if not already read. Anyone who has been around the block a few times would enjoy Climbing Parnassus.  Those who look on that as an easy read (!!!) should take on Norms and Nobility.

I’ll let you in on a secret–I have heard many mature tutors say they have chewed on Norms or Soul of Science over several summers, taking time to digest, not able to complete the meal in one summer.

No experts!  Remember, you didn’t become a part of the Classical Conversations team because you are an expert, but because you love to learn and you have a heart for the students of your community. Learn with them and model your joy in discovery.

Welcome to the hardest job you will ever love.

About lettersfromheartscontent

Mother of six, homeschool teacher, tutor with Classical Conversations, wife to a forester and educator. I tend a perennial garden with a riot of blossoms, ride my bicycle in and out of the watershed, play ocarina and a boom-chick accompaniment when my kids feel like playing contradance music. I love being home, but I love an open road and adventure, too. Classical Conversations' Writers Circle carries my article on some aspect of classical education once a month.
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One Response to Practical Tutor 2

  1. Robbi says:

    Hi again! To answer last week’s question– yes, I believe I found some of your older posts about Challenge B. Here’s one that’s especially apropos! Thank you so much for sharing your insight and experience.

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